David Leavitt

Featured Books

The Two Hotel Francforts

BLOOMSBURY, 2013

Novel

It is the summer of 1940, and Lisbon, Portugal, is the only neutral port left in Europe—a city filled with spies, crowned heads, and refugees of every nationality, tipping back absinthe to while away the time until their escape.

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ARKANSAS: THREE NOVELLAS

HOUGHTON-MIFFLIN, 1997

Novellas

Three stories of escape and exile. In “Saturn Street,” a disaffected screenwriter in Los Angeles delivers lunches to homebound AIDS patients, only to find himself falling in love with one of them. In “The Wooden Anniversary,” Nathan and Celia, familiar characters from my story collections, reunite in Italy after a five-year separation. And in “The Term Paper Artist,” a writer named David Leavitt, hiding out at his father’s house in the aftermath of a publishing scandal, experiences literary rejuvenation when he agrees to write term papers for UCLA undergraduates in exchange for sex.

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IN MAREMMA: LIFE AND A HOUSE IN SOUTHERN TUSCANY

A Revised and Expanded Edition, Counterpoint, 2011 (Co-authored with Mark Mitchell.)

Non-fiction

Now with illustrations and photographs, this new edition of In Maremma recounts the restoration of a dilapidated 1950s farmhouse in southern Tuscany and the process by which the authors became initiated into a part of Italian life foreigners rarely see.

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COLLECTED STORIES

BLOOMSBURY, 2003 (COMPRISING THE MARBLE QUILT, A PLACE I’VE NEVER BEEN, AND FAMILY DANCING.)

Stories

This edition gathers together the stories from Family Dancing, A Place I’ve Never Been, and The Marble Quilt, which has never before appeared in paperback.

Collected Stories is published by Bloomsbury. The collection also appeared in the UK, also from Bloomsbury, as The Stories of David Leavitt.

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THE INDIAN CLERK

BLOOMSBURY, 2007

Novel

On a January morning in 1913, G. H. Hardy—eccentric, charismatic, and, at thirty-seven, already considered the greatest British mathematician of his age—receives in the mail a mysterious envelope covered with Indian stamps. Inside he finds a rambling letter from a self-professed mathematical genius who claims to be on the brink of finding a solution to the Riemann Hypothesis, the most important unsolved mathematical problem of all time.

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THE LOST LANGUAGE OF CRANES

KNOPF, 1986

Novel

Set in the 1980s against the backdrop of a swiftly gentrifying Manhattan, The Lost Language of Cranes tells the story of twenty-five-year-old Philip Benjamin, who realizes he must come out to his parents after falling in love for the first time with a man. Philip’s parents are facing their own crisis: pressure from developers and the loss of their longtime home. But the real threat to the family is Philip’s father’s own struggle with his latent homosexuality, realized only in Sunday afternoon visits to gay porn theaters. Philip’s admission to his parents leads his father to a point of crisis and provokes changes that forever alter the landscape of the family’s lives.

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THE MAN WHO KNEW TOO MUCH: ALAN TURING AND THE INVENTION OF THE COMPUTER

ATLAS/NORTON, 2006

Non-fiction

One of the most important openings in the path to the modern computer was made by the British mathematician Alan Turing—remarkably, while he was solving an entirely different problem. Shy and insecure about his middle-class origins, considered eccentric by those who did not know him well, Turing could show those close to him sly humor and bracing candor—even about his homosexuality. He also had one of the keenest minds of the twentieth century.

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